Dec 092014
 

” Asian and European Diplomacy “

On November 4, much to the surprise of the Western countries, China and Japan resumed the political, economic and military dialogue, at the meeting between Chinese President, Xi Jiping, and Japanese Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe. In September 2014, the Japanese government announced the nationalisation of the Senkaku islands, of which ownership is also claimed by China, the two major Asian countries started the Cold War. Hot maritime events, airspace violations by China and violent anti-Japanese manifestations, a series of these events has led Japan to consider China as their main enemy. Then, Japan cooperated with the Americans, increased their defense budget and everything smelled like gunpowder. From July 2014, they launched another rationale: although a joint statement formalised the dispute between these countries, it is still initiated in the multilevel dialogue. This is a diplomacy lesson to the Europeans, who, like the Americans, give priority to sanctions. One would ask: great diplomacy, but what about these islands governed by the victorious nation of the war, namely Japan, since 1895. These islands are uninhabited, and the main interest is the rich oil reserves as well as of gas. How, then, do these two superpowers think to solve the dispute? It was neither by postponing the solution permanently as the Western countries, especially the British, do, nor by implementing the dangerous policy of sanctions, as was done by Russia to Ukraine. This is the open secret, China and Japan solved by deciding to co-exploit the land. Fifty-fifty is the rationale for the oils. This is the lesson from Asian diplomacy, a perception that is neither rigid nor sclerotic as is usually applied in the European diplomacy. We, the Western countries, should learn the secrets of the China-Japan dialogue to improve the global policy.

Demosthenes Davvetas

My article, which was published at Paraskinio  6th December, titled " Asian and European Diplomacy

On November 4, much to the surprise of the Western countries, China and Japan resumed the political, economic and military dialogue, at the meeting between Chinese President, Xi Jiping, and Japanese Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe. In September 2014, the Japanese government announced the nationalisation of the Senkaku islands, of which ownership is also claimed by China, the two major Asian countries started the Cold War. Hot maritime events, airspace violations by China and violent anti-Japanese manifestations, a series of these events has led Japan to consider China as their main enemy. Then, Japan cooperated with the Americans, increased their defense budget and everything smelled like gunpowder. From July 2014, they launched another rationale: although a joint statement formalised the dispute between these countries, it is still initiated in the multilevel dialogue. This is a diplomacy lesson to the Europeans, who, like the Americans, give priority to sanctions. One would ask: great diplomacy, but what about these islands governed by the victorious nation of the war, namely Japan, since 1895. These islands are uninhabited, and the main interest is the rich oil reserves as well as of gas. How, then, do these two superpowers think to solve the dispute? It was neither by postponing the solution permanently as the Western countries, especially the British, do, nor by implementing the dangerous policy of sanctions, as was done by Russia to Ukraine. This is the open secret, China and Japan solved by deciding to co-exploit the land. Fifty-fifty is the rationale for the oils. This is the lesson from Asian diplomacy, a perception that is neither rigid nor sclerotic as is usually applied in the European diplomacy. We, the Western countries, should learn the secrets of the China-Japan dialogue to improve the global policy.

Demosthenes Davvetas

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