Jan 152015
 

The Phantom of the New Regime”

The words are, as you know, the conceptual picture of things. While listening to the representatives of SYRIZA these days speaking about the programs and their desires, I find that the reasons or their texts are possessed by rhetoric of the new regime. The phrases used are penetrated by unnatural optimism, a climax of ”promising” messages, so extreme that it can easily be wondered whether they have any relation to the reality.Not only by proclaiming to become a political tycoon who will impose your own policy on the Europeans, but even to become a political leader within Europe that will change the Merkelism (such pleasure in saying), it verges on a dangerous naiveté. This is not to say that the EU does not need changes and renewals. But those are the dominant forces inside. And such force is not SYRIZA. The Europeans are not waiting for the leadership speech to make corrective movements. They have already begun. It’s just only towards one different direction from which the opposition of our country proposes. A typical example is France. The logic of ”there are money”, on which Hollande was based for his raising to power, collapsed. The French president has not fulfilled any of his promises. And that is because the policy has been hampered by the harsh reality. What is this? It is the globalization that requires stronger competition among states. But in order to become competitive, country needs reforms that will reduce statism and make entrepreneurship more flexible and creative through research, innovation and new technologies. Hollande had to accept that. By appointing Manuel Valls as Prime Minister of France, it simultaneously marked the change of course. The French Prime Minister aligned with budgetary austerity while denounced it as “obsolete” in the words of the Marxist sense. Despite the reactions of his left-wing party, he continued and continues the “socialist liberalism”. Can this happen with SYRIZA? Many of the officials have already changed the words and the proposals. But the postwar rhetoric remains as a phantom that threatens to lead our country into dangerous paths. Today, more than ever, we need a political discourse of realism, which will begin the phraseology of the European Union and will work for changes within it. The rhetoric of the new regime is an escape from the reality. May SYRIZA change its language, and may it change its word as it is not possible to live with phantoms, but with the dynamics of the present. This is political responsibility.

Demosthenes Davvetas

My article, which was published at Eleytheros Typos today January 15th, titled
''The Phantom of the New Regime''

The words are, as you know, the conceptual picture of things. While listening to the representatives of SYRIZA these days speaking about the programs and their desires, I find that the reasons or their texts are possessed by rhetoric of the new regime. The phrases used are penetrated by unnatural optimism, a climax of ''promising'' messages, so extreme that it can easily be wondered whether they have any relation to the reality.Not only by proclaiming to become a political tycoon who will impose your own policy on the Europeans, but even to become a political leader within Europe that will change the Merkelism (such pleasure in saying), it verges on a dangerous naiveté. This is not to say that the EU does not need changes and renewals. But those are the dominant forces inside. And such force is not SYRIZA. The Europeans are not waiting for the leadership speech to make corrective movements. They have already begun. It’s just only towards one different direction from which the opposition of our country proposes. A typical example is France. The logic of ''there are money'', on which Hollande was based for his raising to power, collapsed. The French president has not fulfilled any of his promises. And that is because the policy has been hampered by the harsh reality. What is this? It is the globalization that requires stronger competition among states. But in order to become competitive, country needs reforms that will reduce statism and make entrepreneurship more flexible and creative through research, innovation and new technologies. Hollande had to accept that. By appointing Manuel Valls as Prime Minister of France, it simultaneously marked the change of course. The French Prime Minister aligned with budgetary austerity while denounced it as "obsolete" in the words of the Marxist sense. Despite the reactions of his left-wing party, he continued and continues the "socialist liberalism". Can this happen with SYRIZA? Many of the officials have already changed the words and the proposals. But the postwar rhetoric remains as a phantom that threatens to lead our country into dangerous paths. Today, more than ever, we need a political discourse of realism, which will begin the phraseology of the European Union and will work for changes within it. The rhetoric of the new regime is an escape from the reality. May SYRIZA change its language, and may it change its word as it is not possible to live with phantoms, but with the dynamics of the present. This is political responsibility.

Demosthenes Davvetas

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